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Books about the future of Journalism

. Books about the future of Journalism


Ethics in Media Communications
by Louis A. Day

Ethics in Media Communications uses case studies throughout each chapter to explore the principles of media ethics. Accessible writing style and coherency between chapters allow for coverage of advanced topics such as morally offensive content and media and privacy.





Media Ethics : Cases and Moral Reasoning (7th Edition)

by Clifford G. Christians, Kim B Rotzoll, Mark B Fackler, Kathy Brittain McKee, Robert H. Woods

Aiming to expand ethical awareness, this market-leading book uses original case studies and commentaries about actual media experiences to get readers thinking analytically about ethical situations in mass communication. Focusing on a wide spectrum of issues, the cases in the book cover journalism, broadcasting, advertising, public relations and entertainment. For anyone interested in the ethical aspects of mass communication.





Ethics in Journalism - Arguments and Cases
by Martin Hirst

Journalism Ethics examines journalism ethics in practice. It examines the social context of the newsroom, the economics of the news industry and cultural expectations of what constitutes news.

Covering ethical issues in the multimedia journalism environment of the 21st Century, Journalism Ethics updates theory and history through a discussion of contemporary and recent case studies that are aligned with the underlying principles of various codes of ethics and charters of editorial
practice. The book provides contextualized case studies and discussion questions for classroom use, covering ethical issues in a logical manner, beginning with broad principles before focusing on specific examples.


The Invention of Journalism Ethics
by Stephen J. A. Ward

Does objectivity in the news media exist? In The Invention of Journalism Ethics Stephen Ward argues that, given the current emphasis on interpretation, analysis, and perspective, journalists and the public need a new theory of objectivity. He explores the varied ethical assertions of journalists over the past few centuries, focusing on the changing relationship between journalist and audience. This historical analysis leads to an innovative theory of pragmatic objectivity that enables journalists and the public to recognize and avoid biased and unbalanced reporting. Ward convincingly demonstrates that journalistic objectivity is not a set of absolute standards but the same fallible but reasonable objectivity used for making decisions in other professions and public institutions.


Media Ethics: An Introduction and Overview
by H. Ronning

This book integrates historical perspectives on media, journalism, and ethics issues and current discussions concerning the functions of the media, relevant ethical and legal frames of reference, and cultural implications. Such topics as editorial responsibility, media and commercialization, and practical journalistic work are addressed. A teacher's guide is incorporated in the text.






We the Media

by Dan Gillmor

Grassroots journalists are dismantling Big Media's monopoly on the news, transforming it from a lecture to a conversation. Not content to accept the news as reported, these readers-turned-reporters are publishing in real time to a worldwide audience via the Internet. The impact of their work is just beginning to be felt by professional journalists and the newsmakers they cover. In We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People, nationally known business and technology columnist Dan Gillmor tells the story of this emerging phenomenon, and sheds light on this deep shift in how we make and consume the news. We the Media is essential reading for all participants in the news cycle:



  • Consumers learn how they can become producers of the news. Gillmor lays out the tools of the grassroots journalist's trade, including personal Web journals (called weblogs or blogs), Internet chat groups, email, and cell phones. He also illustrates how, in this age of media consolidation and diminished reporting, to roll your own news, drawing from the array of sources available online and even over the phone.
  • Newsmakers politicians, business executives, celebrities get a wake-up call. The control that newsmakers enjoyed in the top-down world of Big Media is seriously undermined in the Internet Age. Gillmor shows newsmakers how to successfully play by the new rules and shift from control to engagement.
  • Journalists discover that the new grassroots journalism presents opportunity as well as challenge to their profession. One of the first mainstream journalists to have a blog, Gillmor says, "My readers know more than I do, and that's a good thing." In We the Media, he makes the case to his colleagues that, in the face of a plethora of Internet-fueled news vehicles, they must change or become irrelevant.

At its core, We the Media is a book about people. People like Glenn Reynolds, a law professor whose blog postings on the intersection of technology and liberty garnered him enough readers and influence that he became a source for professional journalists. Or Ben Chandler, whose upset Congressional victory was fueled by contributions that came in response to ads on a handful of political blogs. Or Iraqi blogger Zayed, whose Healing Irag blog (healingiraq.blogspot.com) scooped Big Media. Or acridrabbit, who inspired an online community to become investigative reporters and discover that the dying Kaycee Nichols sad tale was a hoax. Give the people tools to make the news, We the Media asserts, and they will. Journalism in the 21st century will be fundamentally different from the Big Media that prevails today. We the Media casts light on the future of journalism, and invites us all to be part of it.


The Moral Media
by Lee Wilkins, Renita Coleman

The Moral Media provides readers with preliminary answers to questions about ethical thinking in a professional environment. Representing one of the first publications of journalists' and advertising practitioners' response to the Defining Issues Test (DIT), this book compares thinking about ethics by these two groups with the thinking of other professionals.





Reporters on the Battlefield: The Embedded Press System in Historical Context
by Christopher Paul, James J. Kim

An Analysis of the relations between the military and the press explores the factors that led to the development fo the embedded press and distinguishedes the outcomes and goals for the the entitles and for the public, including the right to know.






The Vanishing Newspaper: Saving Journalism In The Information Age
by Philip Meyer

For more than thirty years the newspaper industry has been losing readers at a slow but steady rate. News professionals are inclined to blame themselves, but the real culprit is technology and its competing demands on the public's time. The Internet is just the latest in a long series of new information technologies that have scattered the mass audience that newspapers once held. By isolating and describing the factors that made journalism work as a business in the past, Meyer provides a model that will make it work with the changing technologies of the present and future. He backs his argument with empirical evidence, supporting key points with statistical assessments of the quality and influence of the journalist's product, as well as its effects on business success.



Recommend books, please contact: books@clubofamsterdam.com


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