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Books about Senior Citizens & future Technology

. Books about Senior Citizens & future Technology


The Myth of Generational Conflict : The Family and State in Ageing Societies

by Sara Arber (Editor), Claudine Attias-Donfut (Editor)

This collection brings together a range of leading researchers and theorists from across Europe to advance a sociological understanding of generational relations, in terms of the state and the family and how they are interlinked. Authors examine how changes, such as cuts in welfare provision, migration, urbanization and individualisation influence intergenerational relations.


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Aging and Human Motivation (Plenum Series in Adult Development and Aging)

by Ernest Furchtgott, Mary Wilkes Furchtgott

This book covers age-associated changes in human motivation. Starting with age decrements in energetic or biological functions, it progresses to an analysis of the psychological and sociological factors that affect the behavioral choices of healthy older people. The author emphasizes the contextual nature of human motives to examine a variety of behaviors, ranging from the traditional to the more complex.


Inclusive Housing in an Ageing Society: Innovative Approaches

by Sheila M. Peace (Editor), Caroline Holland (Editor), School of Health and Social Welfare, Open University

The housing problems of older people in our society are highly topical because of the growing number of retired people in the population and, especially, the yet-to-come increasing number of 'very old' people. Government policies on the care of older people have been forthcoming from Whitehall, but the issue of housing is just beginning to be seriously addressed.

This book represents a first attempt at bringing together people from the worlds of architecture, social science and housing studies to look at the future of living environments for an ageing society. Projecting thinking into the future, it asks critical questions and attempts to provide some of the answers. It uniquely moves beyond the issues of accommodation and care to look at the wider picture of how housing can reflect the social inclusion of people as they age.

Inclusive housing in an ageing society will appeal to a wide audience - housing, health and social care workers including: housing officers, architects, planners and designers, community regeneration workers, care managers, social workers and social care assistants, registered managers and housing providers, health improvement staff and, of course, current and future generations of older people.


Impact of Technology on Successful Aging (Springer Series on the Societal Impact on Aging)

by Neil Charness (Editor), K. Warner Schaie (Editor)


This volume provides a detailed examination of changes in technology that impact individuals as they age with an emphasis upon cultural contexts and person-environment fit from human factors, psychological, and sociological perspectives.The editors take into consideration the role of macro-influences in shaping technological changes in industrialized societies that effect successful aging in terms of quality of life. Topics discussed include: human factors and aging; the impact of the internet; and assistive technology. As a special feature, each chapter is followed by two commentaries from experts in the same and neighboring disciplines.


Communication, Technology and Aging: Opportunities and Challenges for the Future

by Neil Charness (Editor), Denise C. Parks (Editor), Bernhard A. Sabel (Editor)

Based on the May 1999 Ann Arbor conference sponsored by the German-American Academic Council (GAAC) Foundation and organized by the University of Michigan, the National Institute on Aging, and the Fraunhofer Institute of Biotechnology. Provides an overview of basic issues in aging and communication, changes in cognition, and human factors design, training, and more.




Technologies for Successful Aging: Proceedings of a Forum Sponsored by White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

by Mindy L. Aisen (Editor)


Communication Technologies For The Elderly: Vision, Hearing & Speech

by Rosemary Lubinski (Editor), D. Jeffery Higginbotham (Editor)

As the population ages-the elderly presently comprise 13% of the U.S. population, a number which is expected to grow to 22% in the next 50 years-so does the need for technology to make up for the degeneration and loss of the faculties of hearing, speech, and vision. Fortunately, there have been great strides in such technologies. this volume, with contributions from experts in various fields, addresses the complex needs of the elderly and what aids are available to improve their quality of life.As the population ages-the elderly presently comprise 13% of the U.S. population, a number which is expected to grow to 22% in the next 50 years-so does the need for technology to make up for the degeneration and loss of the faculties of hearing, speech, and vision. Fortunately, there have been great strides in such technologies. this volume, with contributions from experts in various fields, addresses the complex needs of the elderly and what aids are available to improve their quality of life.


Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered Age

by Bill McKibben

We are on the verge of crossing a line - from born to made, from created to built. Sometime in the next few years, a scientist will reprogram a human egg or sperm cell, spawning a genetic change that will be passed down into eternity. We are sleepwalking toward the future, and it's time to open our eyes.

Nearly fifteen years ago, in The End of Nature, Bill McKibben demonstrated that humanity had begun to irrevocably alter -- and endanger - our environment on a global scale. Now he turns his eye to a new and equally urgent issue: the dangers inherent in an array of technologies that threaten not just our survival, but our identity.

Imagine a future where lab workers can reprogram human embryos to make our children "smarter" or "more sociable" or "happier." Some researchers are doing more than imagining this future; having worked such changes on a wide range of other animals, they've begun to plan for what they see as the inevitable transformation of our species. They are joined by other engineers, working in fields like advanced robotics and nanotechnology, who foresee a not-very-distant day when people merge with machines to create a "posthuman" world.

Enough examines such possibilities, and explains how we can avoid their worst consequences while still enjoying the fruits of our new scientific understandings. More, it confronts the most basic questions that our technological society faces: Will we ever decide that we've grown powerful enough? Can we draw a line and say this far and no further?

McKibben answers yes, and argues that only by staying human can we find true meaning in our lives. A warning against the gravest dangers humans have ever faced, this wise and eloquent book is also a passionate defense of the world we were born into, and a celebration of our ability to say, "Enough."


Mature Audiences: Television in the Lives of Elders (Communications, Media and Cultures Series)

by Karen E. Riggs

In Mature Audiences, Karen Riggs challenges traditional ideas about older viewers as passive, vulnerable audiences for television. She tells the stories of seventy elder Americans who have worked television into their lives in specific and practical ways. In particular, Riggs studies older women fans of Murder, She Wrote, the impact of news and public affairs programming in an affluent retirement community, the efforts of several older African Americans to produce and telecast their own public-access shows, and the role of television in the daily lives of minority elders, including gays, American Indians, and immigrants from Russia and Laos. Although television's own images of the elderly are nearly nonexistent or frequently negative, this collection of interviews provides a portrait of viewers who are often deliberate, thoughtful, and seasoned in their responses to questions about the role of television in their daily lives.

Recommend books, please contact: books@clubofamsterdam.com


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