Club of Amsterdam, Future, Think Tank ..
Menu

Club of Amsterdam Journal
Free Subscription
click here























Club of Amsterdam Journal













 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 


 

 


 

 



 


 

 


 

 

 

 



 




 






 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





keyword search
the future of Shell
more resources : 69 Shell   

 




the future of Shell

Thursday, March 17
, 2011
Reception incl. buffet & drinks: 18:15-19:00, Conference: 19:00-21:15

Tickets

FULLY BOOKED!

Location:
Shell Technology Centre Amsterdam, Grasweg 31, 1031 HW Amsterdam

Please bring your ID and non-Dutch visitors a passport!

The conference language is English.


The event is supported by Shell


We documented the event - take a look at

Videos

Presentations

Impressions


Videos

Credits: Andreas van Engelen, Sound Design, Video

Bill Spence, Manager Strategic Issues, Shell Upstream International
Part 1
, Part 2

Andrei Kotov
, Commercial Adviser Global LNG, Shell Upstream International
Part 1


Guus Berkhout
, Professor of Geosciences, Professor of Innovation
Part 1
, Part 2


Presentations

Bill Spence, Manager Strategic Issues, Shell Upstream International
Energy Scenarios & the future of Shell

Andrei Kotov
, Commercial Adviser Global LNG, Shell Upstream International
the future of Gas


Guus Berkhout
, Professor of Geosciences, Professor of Innovation
New Business Framework for the Energy Industry


Impressions



















..


Building a low-carbon energy future
from the Shell Sustainability Report 2009

The world is starting a shift towards a new, low-carbon energy future. But it will take several decades to get there. Shell is taking steps today to help build the energy system of tomorrow: producing more cleaner burning natural gas; working to deliver advanced fuels and lubricants and lower-carbon biofuels; and building a capability in carbon capture and storage.

As many countries emerge from recession and Asia’s economic growth continues, long-term global demand for energy is rising. By 2050 the world is expected to have over 2 billion more people and energy demand is likely to be twice as high as it is today. At the same time, greenhouse gas emissions must fall by at least half if the planet is to avoid the impact of significant climate change.

Mapping a route to a more sustainable energy future is a challenge for governments, business and consumers alike. It is also a technology opportunity: in the future our economies will be powered by a more diverse mix of fuels and energy sources than ever before. Natural gas – abundant and affordable – will play an increasingly vital role as the world moves towards a low-carbon future. It can act as a bridge to that future and be central to the long-term, lower-carbon energy mix. By 2050 biofuels, wind, solar and other renewables could provide 30% of the world’s energy, according to Shell’s energy scenarios. Oil will remain an important energy source for many decades, as will coal. But we expect industry, cars and domestic appliances to be more energy efficient than they are today.

Transforming the world’s energy system will not be easy. The challenges are “urgent and daunting”, according to the International Energy Agency.

Replacing coal with natural gas in electricity generation where possible – for example, as old coal plants are decommissioned – would cut CO2 emissions significantly in the power sector. A new gas-fired plant produces up to 70% less CO2 than an ageing coal plant and around half the CO2 of a modern coal plant for the same amount of power generated. Gas is more energy efficient than coal and produces electricity at less cost than any other fuel. Adding carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology to a gas-fired power station would further drastically reduce the plant’s CO2 emissions. For those power stations where coal continues to be used, CCS could be installed to reduce emissions. In both cases a price for CO2 needs to exist to make such investments viable.

Regulations will be needed to ensure energy savings by industry are not lost through greater energy use elsewhere. There will also need to be a revolution in consumer behaviour, with people using less power at home and at work.

More sustainable transport can play a crucial part in reducing CO2 emissions, with more advanced petrol and diesel engines powering smaller and lighter vehicles. More advanced fuels and lubricants will help. Biofuels for transport will continue to grow, while electric and hybrid cars are expected to become increasingly common.

Renewable energy will grow rapidly but it will take many years to meet large-scale demand. Traditionally it has taken around 30 years for a new energy source to capture 1% of the global market. Biofuels are there now. Wind power could reach the 1% mark at some point in the coming decade.


The speakers and topics are:

Andrei Kotov, Commercial Adviser Global LNG, Shell Upstream International
the future of Gas

 
Guus Berkhout, Professor of Geosciences, Professor of Innovation
New Business Framework for the Energy Industry

Using new scientific insights, I will reveal that the future energy needs of mankind will be significantly higher than published by the established energy institutes. This means that the fossil ('ancient biomass') industry and the new ('renewable') energy players must work towards a common goal: guaranteed supply of clean energy at affordable prices.

But it is not only the exploding energy needs that will drive the transition of the energy sector. Looking at the fundamental changes occurring in society today, corporations cannot afford to carry on with their business as usual. The purpose of economic growth must be redefined, causing a major transformation in business thinking. I will explain that markets of the future will be steered by societal needs, meaning that social and environmental externalities are essential components of future business models.

Bill Spence, Manager Strategic Issues, Shell Upstream International
Energy Scenarios & the future of Shell

Scenarios describing the future of the world and its energy systems. The
role of oil and gas companies, specifically Shell. What does the future
hold?



18:15 - 19:00
Reception with buffet & welcome drinks

19:00 - 20:00
Introduction by our Moderator
Adriaan Kamp, Owner, Kamp Beheer


Part I:


Andrei Kotov
, Commercial Adviser Global LNG, Shell Upstream International
the future of Gas


Guus Berkhout
, Professor of Geosciences, Professor of Innovation
New Business Framework for the Energy Industry

Bill Spence, Manager Strategic Issues, Shell Upstream International
Energy Scenarios & the future of Shell

20:00 - 20:30
Break with buffet & drinks.

20:30 - 21:15
Part II:
Open discussion




We are fully booked!





Shell Technology Centre Amsterdam

At Shell Technology Centre Amsterdam (STCA) 1,000 technologists, engineers, researchers and laboratory staff work for international customers in and outside Shell. They work constantly to find solutions for current and future energy challenges by improving and renewing oil, gas and chemical products and their processes. Research areas include: fossil fuel products (natural gas and oil), developing clean and affordable alternatives from biomass, CO2 storage options, and catalysts that deliver process enhancements and energy savings.

Shell Technology Centre Amsterdam has a long history in supporting the Chemicals business with process and product development in the following technology areas:
- Lower olefins & aromatics
- Styrene monomer/propylene oxide
- Chemicals and refining catalysts
- Higher olefins and derivatives
- Ethylene oxide and derivatives
- Solvents applications & process
- Process engineering projects

Work is done in conjunction with other delivery groups and the Chemicals business in the areas of:
- Research & Development and Innovation
- Process Engineering and Process Development
- Financial Services

www.shell.com




Andrei Kotov
Commercial Adviser Global LNG,
Shell Upstream International

Andrei Kotov is the Commercial Advisor with Shell's Global LNG Business, prior to which he was a Business Development Advisor CO2 Shell's Carbon Capture and Storage Team.

Andrei holds a Master’s of Science in Economics degree from the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland, with an exchange semester at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business) and an MBA. He subsequently joined Shell Global Solutions International as a Contracts Advisor. Andrei’s career, both prior to joining Shell and within the Shell Group, has comprised a variety of postings ranging from mainly operational to purely commercial across energy industry’s entire value chain. In addition to his experience in the business domain, Andrei is a regular contributor to major business dailies, including Financial Times and International Herald Tribune (the international edition of the New York Times) with commentary topics addressing a broad array of issues of global concern.
www.shell.com




Guus Berkhout
Professor of Geosciences, Professor of Innovation

Professor Guus Berkhout started his career with Shell in 1964, where he held several international positions in R&D and technology transfer. In 1976 he accepted a Chair at Delft University of Technology in the field of geophysical and acoustical imaging. In 2001 he also was appointed in the field of innovation management. Today, his research is financed by a consortium of 35 international companies.

Professor Berkhout is member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) and of the Netherlands Academy of Engineers (AcTI).
www.aj-birchwood.com


 



Bill Spence
Manager Strategic Issues, Shell Upstream International


Bill Spence is the Manager of Strategic Issues for Shell's Upstream International Business. In the 5 years preceding this position Bill was the Vice President CO2 in the Shell's corporate head office.

Bill graduated from Queen's University (Canada) in 1984 with an Engineering Physics degree. He subsequently joined Shell Canada as a Petroleum Engineer. In 1989 he joined Shell International where he has lived and worked in numerous countries. His career has spanned both technical and commercial roles in the Upstream, Gas & Power and Renewables.
www.shell.com


Adriaan Kamp
Owner, Kamp Beheer


Worked 20 years in international project and business development management positions (5 countries) in the Upstream Oil and Gas sector (Shell Group International) and as private entrepreneur. Adriaan’s track record includes the leadership over the successful execution and delivery of major industrial (engineering and energy) projects . He is an accredited Project Manager for large and complex engineering projects.

Adriaan ‘s background combines Entrepreneuring, Business Development and Innovation with Excellence in Execution (Strategy, Execution, People).

Adriaan is presently a member of the Delphi Foundation (international think-tank on Energy matters), a speaker on Cleantech and Energy matters, and has been accredited as a Servant Leader (by Greenleaf Servant Leadership).

Adriaan was born in 1961. Studied Applied Physics (M.Sc.) at the University of Delft. He lives in Overveen, has 2 sons, and hobbies include travelling, sports, spirituality/ religion, business literature and a good conversation with family and friends.





Shell Technology Centre Amsterdam
Grasweg 31
1031 HW Amsterda
m


Visitors are requested to bring valid identification when they visit the STCA.
Please bring your ID and non-Dutch visitors a passport!



By car

Coming from The Hague / Rotterdam
A4 to Amsterdam, then A10: Ring West, following signs to Zaanstad/Leeuwarden. After Coentunnel A10 – Noord follow signs to Volendam / Amersfoort.

Coming from Utrecht
A2 to Amsterdam, then A10: Ring - Amsterdam, following signs to Purmerend.

Coming from Amersfoort / Hilversum
A1 to Amsterdam, then A10: Ring - Oost, follow signs to Amsterdam-Noord, Zaanstad /
Purmerend.

Coming from Alkmaar / Zaandam
A8 to Amsterdam, then A10: Ring - Amsterdam, follow signs to Amersfoort.

Route description from ringway A10

Exit Amsterdam Noord (S 116), follow the signs for Noord / Nieuwendam / Centrum.
Take the first exit headed to Nieuwendam / Ziekenhuis Boven ‘t IJ. At the end of the road turn right towards S 117/Ziekenhuis Boven ‘t IJ.

Go straight, across the bridge to the roundabout. Take the third exit out of the roundabout to Banne Buikerslootlaan. After the turn take a right at the T-junction, towards Kamperfoeliestraat. Take a right at the lights, taking the Floraweg towards Den Haag / Zaanstad.

Follow this road, the Floraweg becomes the Ridderspoorweg, follow this to the end. At the T -junction take a right into Distelweg. After approximately 400 metres follow the Distelweg left into Grasweg. Follow this road for approximately 800 metres to our entrance at Grasweg 31.

Please park your car at the Visitors parking. Your host is advised to reserve a parking space for you in advance.



Public transport
From Schiphol Airport: take the train to Amsterdam Centraal Station.
From Amsterdam Centraal Station: exit Noord. Take the municipal ferry Buiksloterwegpont (free of charge).
Exit the ferry and turn left. Cross the bridge to enter the pedestrian and cycling route along the IJ bank.
Follow the signs. You will reach the main entrance at
Grasweg 31 after approximately 10 minutes.





Related to this topic see also

Club of Amsterdam Journal

and for more events
Agenda



Club of Amsterdam
Phone +31-20-615 4487
info@clubofamsterdam.com


m



Copyright © 2002-2017 Club of Amsterdam. All rights reserved.    Contact     Privacy statement    Cancellation Policy